TriPod: New Orleans At 300

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 is WWNO’s FRESH radio history of New Orleans, released in weekly segments as our city approaches its Tricentennial in 2018. Each TriPod segment is its own micro-documentary, devoted to a single story or subject from New Orleans’ rich history. The series explores lost and neglected stories, delves deeper into the familiar, and questions what we think we know about the city’s history.

Why “TriPod”? “Tri” for the city’s three centuries, “Pod” for podcast, and “tripod”, a three-legged tool used to steady a capturing device that documents a time and place. TriPod moves beyond the familiar themes of New Orleans history to focus on forgotten, neglected, or surprising pieces of the city’s past, and to enrich understanding of its present and future.

TriPod is a production of WWNO in collaboration with The Historic New Orleans Collection and the Midlo Center for New Orleans Studies at the University of New Orleans. The series is hosted and produced by WWNO’s Laine Kaplan-Levenson, working with the assistance of a forty-member international advisory group of historians and archivists.

TriPod airs Thursdays during Morning Edition at 8:30 a.m. on 89.9 FM, repeats on Mondays during All Things Considered, and is available anytime on WWNO.org and as a podcast on iTunes.

Click to meet the TriPod Editorial Board and Advisory Group.  

Click here to open TriPod in iTunes.

Click here to open TriPod in Stitcher.

Subscribe using another podcast player:

- Open your player

- Find the “Subscribe to Podcast” option

- Enter this URL: http://wwno.org/podcasts/88432/rss.xml

Ways to Connect

Historic New Orleans Collection

 Tripod: New Orleans at 300 returns with a look at the Desire community, then and now.

If you've from New Orleans, or you’ve lived here for a minute, you know how often locals identify themselves by their neighborhood. Before Katrina, for thousands of New Orleans residents, these neighborhoods were public housing developments: the Magnolia, B.W. Cooper, C.J. Peete, the Calliope. All those developments are now gone, they’ve all been demolished, and so they’re not part of what’s been this ongoing citywide Tricentennial conversation. But these communities remain super important parts of thousands of people’s lives, and this city's history. So, for one of our final Tripod episodes we decided to hear from residents of the one of those neighborhoods: The Desire.

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with a new TriPod Xtra segment. As part of the New Orleans Museum of Art’s literary ‘Arts and Letters’ series, Laine Kaplan-Levenson spoke with sociologist Peter Marina in front of a live audience about his book ‘Down and Out in New Orleans.’ The two discussed the various informal economies in New Orleans, and alternative lifestyles people choose as a way to live outside of mainstream society. Laine starts the conversation with what Marina’s book is inspired by.

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with a new TriPod Xtra segment. As part of the New Orleans Museum of Art’s literary ‘Arts and Letters’ series, Laine Kaplan-Levenson spoke with sociologist Peter Marina in front of a live audience about his book ‘Down and Out in New Orleans.’ The two discussed the various informal economies in New Orleans, and alternative lifestyles people choose as a way to live outside of mainstream society. Laine starts the conversation with what Marina’s book is inspired by.

Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns to hunt down a rare artifact full of private, and personal information. Laine Kaplan-Levenson goes on the search.

When you first walk into a hospital, before you can see a doctor, you walk up to a counter in a room that sounds like this The person at the desk asks you a bunch of questions, like who's paying your bill, where you come from, your date of birth.

Touro Infirmary has been collecting this same information for over 150 years. 

The Historic New Orleans Collection, Gift of Mr. Al Rose

I crashed an opera rehearsal the other day. A large group of vocalists, young, old, black, white, Hispanic, Asian, all the genders, belted out in long rows surrounding a piano. They were preparing for the 75th anniversary celebration of the New Orleans Opera Association. I was there to talk to a mother-daughter opera combo: Givonna Joseph and Aria Mason.

John Wisdom

You’ve probably heard of the James Beard Awarding-winning Duong Phuong Bakery out in New Orleans East, whether or not you actually got to taste their coveted King Cake. But today, high school students from Metairie Park Country Day take over TriPod to go beyond Duong Phong, and explore the larger Vietnamese community in the East.

Not long after we celebrated New Years Eve 2018, an entire community in New Orleans East celebrated their new years eve. It’s called Tet.

Herb Roe / wikimedia commons

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with a new tripod xtra. Laine Kaplan-Levenson sat down with John Barbry of the Tunica Biloxi nation, to discuss the history of the tribe and its contributions to New Orleans and Louisiana. The Tunica Biloxi land is in Marksville, Louisiana, about three hours outside New Orleans. The  conversation begins when the Tunica Biloxi made contact Spanish explorer Hernando de Soto.

Historic New Orleans Collection

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with a new episode about a Mexican band that rocked the city in the 80s -- the 1880s. 

Long, long ago, a band in New Orleans swept the city off its feet, but it wasn’t a New Orleans Band. It was Mexican.

The Historic New Orleans Collection

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with a tripod Xtra produced by Laine Kaplan-Levenson. In this tripod xtra, we hear an abridged talk given by Dr. Erin Greenwald, curator of the Historic New Orleans Collection's 'The Founding Era' exhibit. Greenwald traces New Orleans' African roots -- from their kidnapping in Africa, through the middle passage, to the seminal role Africans played in the founding of our city.

Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

TriPod put out an episode on the legendary Lastie family — a family that holds generations of iconic musicians. I talked to drummers and first cousins Herlin Riley and Joe Lastie about their experience growing up in this musical family, what it was like to hear Professor Longhair and Dr John play in their living room, what it was like to have their introduce drums into the spiritual church, and what it was like to get yelled at by that same grandfather when they tried to play James Brown in that same spiritual church.

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