Travis Lux

Coastal Reporter

As Coastal Reporter, Travis Lux covers flood protection, coastal restoration, infrastructure, the energy and seafood industries, and the environment. In this role he's reported on everything from pipeline protests in the Atchafalaya swamp, to how shrimpers cope with low prices. He had a big hand in producing the series, New Orleans: Ready Or Not?, which examined how prepared New Orleans is for a future with more extreme weather. In 2017, Travis co-produced two episodes of TriPod: New Orleans at 300 examining New Orleans' historic efforts at flood protection. One episode, NOLA vs Nature: The Other Biggest Flood in New Orleans History, was recognized with awards from the Public Radio News Directors and the New Orleans Press Club. His stories often find a wider audience on national programs, too, like NPR's Morning Edition, WBUR's Here and Now, and WHYY's The Pulse.

Before joining WWNO, Travis reported for Marfa Public Radio in Far West Texas, and for WRKF in Baton Rouge. He studied Anthropology and Sociology at Rhodes College and radio production at the Transom Story Workshop.

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US Army Corps of Engineers

The Army Corps of Engineers has a system for classifying river and hurricane levees across the country. On Thursday, officials announced the final classifications for Southeast Louisiana. From Baton Rouge to New Orleans levee systems are considered “Moderate to High Risk.”

Though that may sound concerning, the Army Corps stresses that these classifications are not safety ratings. New Orleans District commander Colonel Mike Clancy says the levees themselves are in good shape.

Tristan Baurick / Nola.com | The Times-Picayune

This week on the Coastal News Roundup, we take a look at barrier islands — what they do, and why the state is creating them artificially. Plus, we explore what less sediment in the Mississippi River could mean for coastal restoration and the return of a Jean Lafitte tradition: pirogue races.

Pictured left to right: Councilman Jared Brossett, NORA Executive Director Brenda Breaux, NORA Board Chair Jim Singleton, Mayor LaToya Cantrell, and Councilwoman Helena Moreno.
Travis Lux / WWNO

The city of New Orleans is launching a new program to help Gentilly residents install green infrastructure on their properties to absorb rain water.

In 2016, the city got more than $141.2 million to improve stormwater management through the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s National Disaster Resilience Competition.

Travis Lux / WWNO

 

New Orleans is a city that floods. Even a small storm can leave streets impassable. City officials say they’re working on solutions, but they’re also asking citizens to help out.

All this week we’ve aired stories about how prepared the city is for the threats that climate change will bring — heavier rains, bigger storms, extreme temperatures — and there are some serious doubts. That’s why some people are taking matters into their own hands.

Michael Isaac Stein / The Lens

Scientists say climate change will bring heavier rains and more intense storms. City officials have acknowledged that New Orleans needs to rethink how it deals with rain — by reducing reliance on mechanical pumps and managing the water where it falls.

Thanks to a post-Katrina settlement with FEMA, the city has more than $2 billion to fix streets and drainage — a perfect opportunity to try some new ideas. But will it?

NOAA

This week on the Coastal News Roundup: WWNO’s Travis Lux talked with Tristan Baurick from Nola.com/The Times Picayune about hurricane season, deep-sea coral protections, and the latest on the plague of dying roseau cane.

 

 

Travis Lux / WWNO

When the Mississippi River flooded this spring, tons of water gushed through the Bonnet Carré Spillway, and into Lake Pontchartrain. The spillway is a big swath of open land, and it relieves the swollen river.

National Hurricane Center / NOAA

One group of forecasters has decreased its 2018 hurricane season forecast from above-average to below-average.

There are typically about 12 named storms in the Atlantic during hurricane season.

Coastal Protectiona and Restoration Authority (CPRA)

This week on the Coastal News Roundup: A local parish refuses to cooperate on a coastal restoration project, and the state is threatening to sue.

Will Brown

According to a new report, more than 40,000 Louisiana homes and 99,00 Louisiana residents are at risk of chronic flooding due to rising seas in the next 30 years. In total, 311,000 homes may be at risk across the United States.

 

The report was published by the Union of Concerned Scientists, a climate change advocacy group. Researchers made the calculation by combining sea level rise predictions with data from Zillow, an online real estate company.

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