Travis Lux

Coastal Reporter

As Coastal Reporter, Travis Lux covers flood protection, coastal restoration, infrastructure, the energy and seafood industries, and the environment. In this role he's reported on everything from pipeline protests in the Atchafalaya swamp, to how shrimpers cope with low prices. He had a big hand in producing the series, New Orleans: Ready Or Not?, which examined how prepared New Orleans is for a future with more extreme weather. In 2017, Travis co-produced two episodes of TriPod: New Orleans at 300 examining New Orleans' historic efforts at flood protection. One episode, NOLA vs Nature: The Other Biggest Flood in New Orleans History, was recognized with awards from the Public Radio News Directors and the New Orleans Press Club. His stories often find a wider audience on national programs, too, like NPR's Morning Edition, WBUR's Here and Now, and WHYY's The Pulse.

Before joining WWNO, Travis reported for Marfa Public Radio in Far West Texas, and for WRKF in Baton Rouge. He studied Anthropology and Sociology at Rhodes College and radio production at the Transom Story Workshop.

Ways to Connect

Ben Depp / For WWNO

Recovery of the remains of two workers killed in the collapse of the Hard Rock Hotel construction site last October could begin at the end of this week or early next week, New Orleans Fire Department Superintendent Tim McConnell said at a press conference Monday afternoon.

Sheriff's deputies negotiate with protesters disrupting construction of the Bayou Bridge Pipeline in Sept. 2018.
Travis Lux / WWNO

The temporary closure of the Dakota Access Pipeline will not affect Louisiana’s Bayou Bridge Pipeline, according to the company that owns both.

Ben Depp / For WWNO

The city of New Orleans is launching a meal assistance program aimed at getting hot meals to residents struggling to get food during the coronavirus pandemic.

Ben Depp / National Geographic Society

By now we’ve heard time and time again how the moment we’re all living through is historic, anxious and unprecedented. A global pandemic has killed hundreds of thousands, wrecked the global economy, and created record unemployment. Anti-racism protests have mobilized millions of people around the world calling for major reforms to policing and public policy. It’s changed the way many of us live, work and think.

Ashley Dean / WWNO

The world erupted after the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis on Memorial Day. In New Orleans, activists have been holding rallies calling for police accountability and criminal justice reform in the weeks since then.

New Orleans Public Radio has been covering those rallies, and we talked to some New Orleans residents about why they’re out protesting — and their hopes for the future.

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