Travis Lux

Coastal Reporter

As Coastal Reporter, Travis Lux covers flood protection, coastal restoration, infrastructure, the energy and seafood industries, and the environment. In this role he's reported on everything from pipeline protests in the Atchafalaya swamp, to how shrimpers cope with low prices. He had a big hand in producing the series, New Orleans: Ready Or Not?, which examined how prepared New Orleans is for a future with more extreme weather. In 2017, Travis co-produced two episodes of TriPod: New Orleans at 300 examining New Orleans' historic efforts at flood protection. One episode, NOLA vs Nature: The Other Biggest Flood in New Orleans History, was recognized with awards from the Public Radio News Directors and the New Orleans Press Club. His stories often find a wider audience on national programs, too, like NPR's Morning Edition, WBUR's Here and Now, and WHYY's The Pulse.

Before joining WWNO, Travis reported for Marfa Public Radio in Far West Texas, and for WRKF in Baton Rouge. He studied Anthropology and Sociology at Rhodes College and radio production at the Transom Story Workshop.

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Coastal News Roundup: Refinery Flare Edition

Mar 16, 2018
Roy Luck / Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

Last weekend, New Orleanians noticed a big fireball coming from the Chalmette Refining refinery. Some worried there had been an explosion, but it turns out it was a really big flare — a fiery plume that burns off excess stuff created during the oil refining process.

Travis Lux / WWNO

The Army Corps of Engineers opened the Bonnet Carre Spillway to a big crowd Thursday morning, in order to relieve pressure on Mississippi River levees downstream.

 

The Army Corps estimates 500-600 people showed up to watch the Corps open the Spillway. Katie Huffaker drove all the way from Houma. She homeschools her kids and thought it would make for a good lesson in geography.  

Travis Lux / WWNO

The company behind the controversial Dakota Access Pipeline has started building a pipeline through South Louisiana. Protesters are disrupting construction, and now a judge has ordered construction in the Atchafalaya Basin to stop while a lawsuit plays out in court.

Travis Lux / WWNO

The Army Corps of Engineers will open the Bonnet Carré Spillway on Thursday to prevent river flooding near New Orleans.

 

The Mississippi River is rising, as floodwater from the Midwest makes its way south.

Travis Lux / WWNO

Join WWNO's Coastal Desk for a canoe and kayak trip down Cane Bayou on the Northshore!

One of the coolest things about the Louisiana coast is the way it gradually transitions from cypress swamp into open marsh, and you'll see it firsthand on Cane Bayou. The trip will be led by a master naturalist, who will tell us all about the plants, animals and history of this slice of Louisiana's unique coastal ecosystem. 

Travis Lux / WWNO

The weather is warm, Mardi Gras is over and it’s festival season. That means, time for crawfish boils.

 

Despite the slow start to crawfish season, officials held a celebration Tuesday to mark the opening of the season. But for the second year in a row, one crawfish got off a little easy.

Michael Maples / U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

This week on the Coastal News Roundup: Louisiana files a lawsuit against the Army Corps of Engineers, how the latest federal budget could speed up sediment diversions and a pair of pollution-related settlements.

Tristan Baurick / Nola.com | The Times-Picayune

This week on the Coastal News Roundup: An update on the bug destroying the bird’s foot marsh, some research from the Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill and Ecosystem Science conference and the environmental consequences of glitter.

Travis Lux / WWNO

Countries across the world are starting to ban some microplastics. Like microbeads — the tiny pieces of plastic used in soap and face washes.

 

This time of year in New Orleans, it’s almost raining plastic, from beads to glitter. Lots of glitter. But what happens to all that sparkly stuff after it washes away? WWNO’s Travis Lux took a look at the environmental consequences of glitter.

Tristan Baurick / Nola.com|The Times-Picayune

The bounty of the Louisiana Coast has helped make New Orleans a food capital. But humans have put the once-plentiful resources — like fish — at risk. 

On this week's coastal news roundup, Nola.com/Times-Picayune environmental reporters Sara Sneath and Tristan Baurick talk about how chefs, fishermen and companies are fighting to keep Louisiana on the food map.

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