standardized tests

OPSB Superintendent Henderson Lewis touted a smooth unification process, but seemed to be bracing for a drop in test scores.
Jess Clark / WWNO - New Orleans Public Radio

The Orleans Parish School Board is touting a smooth transition to a new unified school district, but also seems to be bracing for new challenges as the state moves to a tougher school grading system.

 

A new state report showing how well students are progressing shows less than half of Louisiana students are on track to master important skills and knowledge.
DCJOHN / Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

Less than half of Louisiana students are on track to master important math, reading and writing skills, according to a new report from the Louisiana Department of Education.  

The Orleans Parish School Board held its first meeting as head of the new unified school district Thursday night. Nearly all public schools in the parish are under its control for the first time since Hurricane Katrina. But while the district is unified, public opinion is not. 

George Washington Carver High School class of 2018 files in for their graduation ceremony.
Jess Clark / WWNO - New Orleans Public Radio

It’s been nearly 13 years since Hurricane Katrina decimated the city and its school system. And a lot has changed since then. Now the city is the first, large school district in the nation where nearly all students attend charter schools. But the reforms are controversial, and have left many wondering, did they work?

Results from the 2018 state standardized tests show New Orleans-area students are trailing their peers statewide.
midnightpeace_90 / Flickr

On average, kids in Louisiana public schools tested slightly better on their standardized tests this year. But New Orleans-area kids still trail behind the state, and achievment gaps for certain groups of students remain persistent.

 

This year kids were tested in math, social studies and English language arts (ELA). The state raised the bar this year for what it means to be on grade level - students now have to score at the “mastery" level to meet the standard.

 

 

 

Results from the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), also known as "The National's Report Card," show Louisiana student achievement dropping over the last two years. Every two years, the U.S. Department of Education tests a nationally representative group of fourth and eighth grade students in math and reading.

State education officials say the percentage of Louisiana public school students reaching "basic" achievement levels on standardized tests grew from 66 percent to 68 percent this year. Statewide, improvement was noted at almost every grade level and every subject.