brown pelican

Jason Saul

The Trump administration is making major changes to the Endangered Species Act, which could affect some plants and animals in Louisiana.

The act, passed in the 1970’s, protects endangered plants and animals. At that time, the “pelican state” almost lost its state bird. The brown pelican was on the brink of extinction. Then, officials went to Florida and brought back juvenile pelicans to reestablish them in Louisiana. In 2009 they were officially taken off the list of endangered species.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service/Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

This week on the Coastal News Roundup: officials investigate who or what might have been behind all the dead pelicans in Plaquemines and St. Bernard Parishes. Plus, an update on the Taylor Energy oil well that’s been leaking in the Gulf of Mexico for almost 15 years.

WWNO’s Travis Lux talks with environment reporter Tristan Baurick from Nola.com | The Times-Picayune about the week in coastal news.

Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries

This week on the Coastal News Roundup: the Endangered Species Act. The ESA went into effect in 1973, and since then, several Louisiana species that were once endangered have come back from the brink of extinction.

 

Recently, both congress and the Trump Administration have proposed changes to the law.

 

Sara Sneath, environmental reporter for Nola.com/The Times-Picayune, has been writing about the impact of the law in Louisiana. WWNO’s Travis Lux spoke with her about the proposed changes, and how the act has helped some of Louisiana’s most iconic species -- like the American alligator, the brown pelican, and the Louisiana black bear.