The Potlikker Papers

As in cities worldwide, the streets of New Orleans have come alive this spring with protests, marches, and rallies for racial justice. The Crescent City has long been a hotbed for activism and played an important role in civil rights era organizing that helped put an end to Jim Crow. This week, we take a look at the legacy of the segregated South through stories about the intersections of food, race, and labor over the past century.

Click Here To Listen To This Week's Show:  https://omny.fm/shows/its-new-orleans-louisiana-eats/food-and-race-through-the-lens-of-history

 Civil Rights activists sit in protest at Woolworth’s lunch counter in Durham, North Carolina, February 10, 1960.
Courtesy of the State Archives of North Carolina / State Archives of North Carolina

The South has a rich and varied food history, but too often it's reduced to stereotype. On this week's show, we explore the influence of the South on America’s culinary identity, and the central role African-American and immigrant cooks played in its formation.