where y'eat

Ian McNulty

Children, they’re precious. They’re worth everything we do for them. They are the future. But let’s face it, sometimes children are aggravating, especially when they’re at a restaurant where you just want to unwind and they’re just revving up.

Ian McNulty

New Orleans is famous for restaurants. But if you really want to understand New Orleans food culture, there’s no better place than around the home table. This is where the bigger picture of the New Orleans food obsession unfurls.

Ian McNulty

Halloween comes down to one word: candy. And making Halloween matter comes down to you.

Ian McNulty

The news was hard for some to believe. Tujague’s Restaurant, the second-oldest restaurant in New Orleans, will relocate. But it is happening, and when the move is complete the question may be, do people still believe in Tujague’s?

Ian McNulty

Where y’eat? How about where y’eatin’ next? That’s no small question, not in New Orleans, where new restaurants keep coming and our connection to old favorites endure.

In my job chasing the New Orleans restaurant scene I try to keep up with it all, so today I’m offering a quick round up of what’s been on my mind and in my notebook.

Ian McNulty

In ancient times, heroes spent the afterlife in Elysian Fields. Here in New Orleans, Elysian Fields Avenue is the connection for a heroic hot sausage po-boy that lives on.

Jambalaya, cooked outdoors in heavy iron pots, is a common sight around Louisiana during football season.
Ian McNulty

Sometimes, Louisiana culture seems to run countercyclical to mainstream America. So it goes that, with Labor Day well behind us and with others putting away outdoor summertime pleasures like so many pool toys, people here are wheeling out their grills, filling up the propane tanks and wiping down their heirloom cast iron.

 

The reason isn’t the calendar, and it really isn’t even the temperature. It’s football.

Ian McNulty

A Hubig’s pie was a humble pie. But it had a huge place in the heart of New Orleans. Want proof? Just look at the response when the first little blip of good news on the future of Hubig’s hit the headlines.

Ian McNulty

From a walk-up counter, NolaNica serves Nicaraguan soul food, like chicken with rice and beans, and mash-ups, like Mombacho nachos, a dish with fried plantains and a name that makes me smile.

Coolinary is a popular prix fixe promotion in August in New Orleans. The seafood stuffed eggplant at Brigtsen's Restaurant is dish on its Coolinary menu.
Ian McNulty

Blink and suddenly August is here. Summer is flying by once again. Where does the time go? But time is relative, and for New Orleans restaurants this is when time slows to a crawl.

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