Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations

Coastal News Roundup: Major Report Says Future Grim, But Climate Target Technically Possible

screen_shot_2018-10-15_at_4.53.46_pm.png
Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)
Authors of the report say it's technically possible to keep the world from warming beyond 1.5°C, but doing so would require massive, rapid changes -- such as reducing carbon emissions by 75-90% in the next 30 years."

The goal of the 2016 Paris Climate agreement is to limit global warming to less than two degrees celsius above pre-industrial levels. While President Trump has announced his intentions to pull out of the agreement, other nations, cities, and researchers are still working toward that goal.

This week, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) released a report showing what will happen if the earth warms more than 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels (we’re already at about 1°C). The outlook is dire.

For this week’s coastal news roundup, WWNO’s Travis Lux spoke with one of the report’s authors, Bill Solecki, professor of Geography at Hunter College in New York.

You can catch the Coastal News Roundup on 89.9 FM every Friday at 7:45am and 4:44pm.

Support for the Coastal Desk comes from the Walton Family Foundation, the Greater New Orleans Foundation, the Foundation for Louisiana, and local listeners.

As Coastal Reporter, Travis Lux covers flood protection, coastal restoration, infrastructure, the energy and seafood industries, and the environment. In this role he's reported on everything from pipeline protests in the Atchafalaya swamp, to how shrimpers cope with low prices. He had a big hand in producing the series, New Orleans: Ready Or Not?, which examined how prepared New Orleans is for a future with more extreme weather. In 2017, Travis co-produced two episodes of TriPod: New Orleans at 300 examining New Orleans' historic efforts at flood protection. One episode, NOLA vs Nature: The Other Biggest Flood in New Orleans History, was recognized with awards from the Public Radio News Directors and the New Orleans Press Club. His stories often find a wider audience on national programs, too, like NPR's Morning Edition, WBUR's Here and Now, and WHYY's The Pulse.

👋 Looks like you could use more news. Sign up for our newsletters.

* indicates required
New Orleans Public Radio News
New Orleans Public Radio Info