History

Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

A third confederate monument in New Orleans was removed in the middle of the night. The statue of P.G.T. Beauregard that once stood at the entrance to New Orleans’ City Park is now gone.

It took almost 7 hours for workers to strap the statue of confederate general PGT Beauregard and his horse to a crane and lift it onto a flatbed truck. Karen Murray was there in protest. She wiped away angry tears as she watched workers set up in the dark.

Elizabeth Miller

Jazz historian John McCusker captures moments, whether it's through his photography, his writing, or his storytelling. As the creator and guide of the Cradle of Jazz Tour, John takes people on New Orleans tours that link together specific locations with the vanguards, players, keepers, and lovers of jazz music. John joined NolaVie's Kelley Crawford in the studio to share some legends from the Jazz Age.  

Visit NolaVie's website for a related article written by Kelley Crawford.  

The Women Who Fought For And Against The ERA: Part I

Apr 20, 2017
Pat Denton Collection / Newcomb Archives, Tulane University

This is the first in a two-part series on the local Second-wave feminist movement and the battle over the Equal Rights Amendment. Listen to Part II here. 

It’s July 3rd, 1982. Feminists are marching through downtown New Orleans in support of the Equal Rights Amendment, the ERA.

TriPod Xtras: Broadmoor Neighborhood History Dialogue

Mar 30, 2017
Infrogmation / Wikimedia Commons

This is another edition of TriPod Xtras. We’ve cut together some highlights from a really interesting panel we went to a little while back, put on by the Broadmoor Improvement Association and held at Propeller. This event was right up our alley, because it was like a mashup of oral history and community engagement, and gave space for elders to share their experiences alongside folks that are doing work today.

Sandra Green Thomas

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with part two of its series about one of the largest sales of enslaved people in our country’s history, and an attempt at reconciliation. Listen to Part I here

We left off at the Sold South Panel that took place in New Orleans in December of 2016. The discussion centered around something Georgetown University did in 1838 when the institution sold 272 enslaved people to two plantations in Louisiana to avoid bankruptcy.

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