History

Jennifer Waxman / The National WWII Museum

Some say history belongs to the victors, but at the National World War II Museum, historical objects belong to the archivists. Jennifer Waxman is an archivist who handles much of the Museum’s rare artifacts, from handwritten letters to combat tanks. Jennifer spoke with NolaVie’s Brian Friedman about the life of an archivist and the places that life takes her.

Visit NolaVie's website for a related article written by Brian Friedman.

Henriette Delille And The Sisters Of The Holy Family

Nov 3, 2016
The entrance to the Sisters of The Holy Family Motherhouse on Chef Menteur Highway in New Orleans East
Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

TriPod New Orleans at 300 returns with a story of The Sisters of the Holy Family, the religious order of nuns for free women of color founded by Henriette Delille before the Civil War. They’re still ministering today.

Driving along Chef Menteur Highway out in New Orleans East, you pass your fair share of fast food joints, RV parks, and Super 8 motels. And then, a huge Nativity scene on a big mid-century building. It’s the motherhouse of the Sisters of the Holy Family.

Courtesy Richard Campanella

Each month WWNO talks to Tulane School of Architecture Professor of Geography Richard Campanella about his "Cityscapes" column for Nola.com | The Times-Picayune. He's been chronologically exploring the architectural styles that have swept the city. In the early 1900s New Orleans - like much of the nation - turned its eye toward California.

The Cemetery Under The French Quarter

Oct 6, 2016
A 1972 Times-Picayune article detailing the discovery of coffins buried in the French Quarter.
University of New Orleans

October is Louisiana Archeology month! And this week’s TriPod New Orleans at 300 digs into the discovery, and rediscovery, of New Orleans’ first cemetery.

When you walk around the French Quarter, you see all kinds of tours going by- intimate horse drawn carriage tours, ghost tours, architectural tours. But most tours don’t touch one of the neighborhood’s most significant landmarks. Probably because you can’t see it.

TriPod Mythbusters: Quadroon Balls And Plaçage

Sep 22, 2016
Agostino Brunias / ArtDaily.org

There is a common myth told about 19th-century New Orleans. It goes something like this: Imagine you’re in an elegant dance hall in New Orleans in the early 1800s. Looking around, you see a large group of white men and free women of color, who were at the time called quadroons, meaning they supposedly had ¼ African ancestry. The mothers play matchmakers, and introduce their daughters to these white men, who then ask their hand in a dance.

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