New Orleans drainage

A turbine housed at the Sewerage and Water Board's facility Uptown exploded on Saturday, December 14th. As of Wednesday, the SWB says it does not yet know the cause of the incident.
Travis Lux / WWNO

The Sewerage and Water Board of New Orleans says it does not yet know why one of its power turbines exploded over the weekend.

On November 16th, voters in Orleans Parish will decide whether to approve three ballot propositions that could generate millions of dollars for city infrastructure projects.
Jess Clark / WWNO

In a report released Tuesday, the non-partisan Bureau for Governmental Research (BGR) has endorsed three ballot propositions that would collectively generate millions of dollars in both annual and one-time funding, most of which would be spent on infrastructure projects.

Travis Lux / WWNO

Last year, the city of New Orleans announced that workers had sucked 46 tons of Mardi Gras beads from catch basins on the side of the road. And that was from just five blocks along St. Charles Avenue -- one of the main parade routes.

That news got a lot of attention, and a growing number of people are trying to figure out how to reduce Mardi Gras waste -- without reducing the magic.

This week on the Coastal News Roundup, WWNO’s Travis Lux and Thomas Walsh take a look at what’s being done.

Kira Akerman/Zac Manuel

The documentary Station 15, directed by Kira Akerman, follows Chasity Hunter -- then a high school student -- as she learns about water infrastructure in New Orleans.

 

Hunter is becoming an informal ambassador for the city around water management and climate change. Last month, she represented New Orleans with a panel of other students from around the country as part of the Global Climate Action Summit in San Francisco -- where activists called on politicians to do more about climate change.

 

WWNO’s Travis Lux spoke with Hunter about her experience at the Summit, and her investigation of New Orleans water infrastructure.

Travis Lux / WWNO

Floods this summer revealed that New Orleans’ drainage system hasn’t been working at full capacity. Since then, the city has been scrambling to improve the system in a number of ways — from repairing drainage pumps to clearing catch basins on the street.

 

This weekend, the city will teach citizens how to clean catch basins themselves. They’re calling it Adopt-A-Catch Basin.

 

Catch basins are those grated gutters on the sides of the road. When it rains, water flows through those grates before it’s pumped out of the city.

New Orleans voters will be heading to the polls tomorrow to decide what the city drainage system will look like, how firefighters are paid and the direction of the Criminal District Court.