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Trappers, Gunslingers, And The War On Delacroix Island

Sep 21, 2018
The Historic New Orleans Collection

On upper Decatur Street in the French Quarter, there's a unique mint green building with the words "Delacroix Corporation" displayed across the facade. Little do most New Orleanians know, but the origins of the Delacroix Corporation can be traced back to the Isleños people of Saint Bernard Parish, who were once muskrat trappers. On this edition of NOLA Life Stories, Dorothy Benge, who serves as the current president of the Delacroix Corporation, traces her family history back to those days, when the muskrat trappers went to war.

Joshua Brasted

Since 1986, Southern Rep Theatre has been producing original and classic plays that speak to the depth and diversity of New Orleans culture. Now, after six years without a permanent home, Southern Rep has found one. The former Saint Rose de Lima Church on Bayou Road has been transformed into a theatre complex. NolaVie’s Renée Peck catches up with Aimee Hayes, the company’s Producing Artistic Director, to hear all about Southern Rep’s housewarming.

Aretha Franklin
American Routes

After Aretha Franklin signed with Atlantic Records in 1967, producer Jerry Wexler brought her to record in Muscle Shoals, Alabama. Known for its local recording studios, including FAME and Muscle Shoals Sound, the Tennessee River town produced many hits and allowed the black and white music worlds to coalesce.  In 1967, Aretha recorded her first big hit, “I Never Loved A Man (The Way I Love You)” at FAME studios, but all did not go smoothly. Studio guitarist Jimmy Johnson tells the story.

Like most girls her age, Susan Cowsill watched The Partridge Family every week on television. But unlike most girls her age, she was related to the Partridges, albeit in a Hollywood kind of way. The show was modeled after Cowsill and other members of her singing family.

 

In the 1960s and early ’70s, The Cowsills were regulars on television, appearing with Ed Sullivan, Johnny Cash and on their own programs. They also had a string of top ten hits, including “The Rain, the Park and Other Things,” and “Hair.”

Fried chicken from McHardy's Chicken & Fixin' in New Orleans.
Ian McNulty

Sometimes a good festival can put a focus on just why we get so fired up about certain foods.

This weekend, fried chicken gets its turn, as the Fried Chicken Festival returns to Woldenberg Park along the French Quarter riverfront. 

This event is a gathering of the tribes of fried chicken lovers, and they are many.

Eileen Fleming / WWNO

A task force is examining if the shuttered Municipal Auditorium could be the new home for city government.

Courtesy of Diavolo

This week on Inside the Arts, Diavolo | Architecture in Motion, brings a high energy performance to the Mahalia Jackson Theater, kicking off a new season of dance for the New Orleans Ballet Association.  We talk with Diavolo founder and artistic director Jacques Heim.

This week on the Tricentennial Reading List - Susan Larson continues her look at 300 great New Orleans books with geographer and author Richard Campanella, as they talk about books on New Orleans geography.

This week on The Reading Life:  Susan talks with Justin Nystrom, author of" Creole Italian: Sicilian Immigrants and the Shaping of New Orleans Food Culture.” Yummy! We’ll also hear from Patty Friedmann about her new short story collection, “Where Do They All Come From?”

Here’s what’s on tap in the literary life this week:

 Keith O’Brien discusses and signs “Fly Girls: How Five Daring Women Defied All Odds and Made Aviation History,” Monday, September 17, at 6 p.m. at Octavia Books. 

Harry Shearer
Harry Shearer / Harry Shearer

This week on Le Show Harry Shearer brings us News From Outside the Bubble, News of Bad Banks, News of Microplastics, Apologies of the Week, News of Bees, Land of 15,000 Princes, News of the Godly, as well as original music, updates on the Senate race in Texas, and other news you might have missed.

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