Coastal Desk

Southeast Louisiana is sinking under the waves faster than any coastal landscape in the world. With so much at stake for Louisiana and the nation, WWNO has made coastal news a priority.

Since mid-2014 our Coastal Desk reporting team has been producing frequent news reports and in-depth features covering coastal erosion and restoration; hurricane protection; offshore energy and other coastal businesses; wildlife and fisheries impacts; and coastal communities and culture.

Support for the Coastal Desk comes from the Walton Family Foundation, the Greater New Orleans Foundation, and local listeners.

Subscribe to the Coastal Desk as a podcast:

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3. Enter this URL: http://wwno.org/podcasts/70174/rss.xml

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Kyle Plover / Cornell Lab of Ornithology

This week on the Coastal News Roundup -- how weather radar can be used to count migrating birds. Plus, the state looks to increase the size of a major (and controversial) coastal restoration project.

 

WWNO’s Travis Lux talks about the week in coastal news with environment reporter Sara Sneath from Nola.com | The Times-Picayune.

 

CPRA

Louisiana’s Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority (CPRA) released a draft of its new annual plan at the monthly CPRA Board meeting on Wednesday, Jan.16. At the meeting, officials said they plan to seek permits for a significantly bigger Mid-Breton river diversion.

BP

This week on the Coastal News Roundup, WWNO’s Travis Lux talks with Mark Schleifstein, environment reporter for Nola.com/The Times-Picayune, about a big new oil find in the Gulf of Mexico. Plus, the latest on a lawsuit related to Hurricane Katrina damages.

 

The following transcript has been lightly edited:

CPRA

This week on the Coastal News Roundup, WWNO’s Travis Lux talks with columnist Bob Marshall from Nola.com | The Times-Picayune. They reviewed some of the big environmental news of 2018 -- and look ahead toward the likely stories of 2019.

 

Travis Lux / WWNO

The ribbon of marshland between New Orleans East and Slidell is referred to as the New Orleans East Landbridge. The strip of land protects people from storm surge. Like other parts of the coast, it’s eroding - and as sea levels rise, that could make flooding worse on both the north shore and the south shore of Lake Ponchartrain.

The state of Louisiana is often the entity advocating for specific coastal restoration projects, but now the city of New Orleans is getting involved. WWNO’s Travis Lux spoke with New Orleans Coastal Program Manager Anne Coglianese about the Landbridge restoration, and the city’s involvement.

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Environmental issues were big news in 2018 -  locally, nationally, and globally. World leaders from 195 countries gathered in Poland to discuss how to reduce global greenhouse gas emissions. A major federal climate report said the U.S. is already feeling the effects of climate change - in the shape of deadly wildfires, devastating hurricanes, and record temperatures.

Travis Lux / WWNO

For all you Grinches out there chomping at the bit to get rid of your Christmas tree, you might want to wait until January. Several local governments will be collecting and recycling trees in the new year to help fight coastal land loss.

WWNO / Travis Lux

Thousands of miles of canals have been cut throughout Louisiana’s coastal marsh -- most of them for oil and gas wells and pipelines. A lot of them have never been filled back in, which has contributed to coastal erosion.

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

The Trump administration is proposing changes to how a big environmental law -- the Clean Water Act --  is enforced. That could have implications for many of Louisiana’s wetlands, and the state’s efforts to restore the eroding coast.

 

To better understand what the proposed changes could mean for Louisiana, WWNO’s Travis Lux spoke with water law expert Mark Davis, who leads the Tulane Institute on Water Resources Law and Policy.

Tristan Baurick / Nola.com | The Times-Picayune

This week on the Coastal News Roundup: marshes are usually pretty wet, so you might not think they'd burn -- but near Avery Island, land managers are lighting them on fire. Plus, we discuss conflict of interest accusations around one of the state’s big coastal restoration projects.

WWNO’s Travis Lux talks about the week in coastal news with environment reporter Tristan Baurick from Nola.com | The Times-Picayune.

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