Angola prison

Kerry Myers

The road to Angola, the Louisiana State Penitentiary, is long and isolated. It sets the plantation-turned-prison back from lush and hilly West Feliciana Parish, an otherwise picturesque corner of the state.

Eileen Fleming / WWNO

Inmates in Louisiana prisons are placed in solitary confinement at four times the national average. That’s one finding from a report released Tuesday. 

This week on The Reading Life: New Orleans native Albert Woodfox, author of “Solitary: My Journey of Transformation and Hope.” He is the last of the group known as the Angola 3 to be released from the Louisiana State Penitentiary at Angola. This memoir describes his early life, as well as how he survived more than four decades in solitary confinement, more than any other incarcerated man in America.

American Routes Shortcuts: Charles Neville

Jan 19, 2018
Charles Neville with the Jazzmen at Angola Prison
Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities

This week on American Routes Shortcuts, saxophonist and Neville Brother, Charles Neville, shares about his time at Angola Prison in the 60s. He was among many great musicians who were sent to the penitentiary for drug offenses. One of his great contributions as an inmate was helping to racially and musically integrate prison life. Charles helped form the unlikely but prolific bebop group, the Nic Nacs and found solace in the music he encountered while at Angola.

American Routes Shortcuts: Charles Neville

Sep 29, 2017
Charles Neville with the Jazzmen at Angola Prison
Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities

This week on American Routes Shortcuts, saxophonist Charles Neville shares about his time at Angola Prison in the '60s. He was among many great musicians who were sent to the penitentiary for drug offenses. One of his great contributions as an inmate was helping to racially and musically integrate prison life. Charles helped form the unlikely but prolific bebop group, the Nic Nacs, and found solace in the music he encountered while at Angola.

The Hearse Driver of Angola

Jun 15, 2017
Lori Waselchuk

At the Louisiana State Penitentiary, better known as Angola, people are serving life without parole sentences in greater numbers than in any other prison in the country. With so many prisoners passing away on the inside, funeral processions have become a tradition of their own. Lloyd Bone has been in Angola for 46 years now, and serves as the prison’s funeral hearse carriage driver. In this edition of NOLA Life Stories, in the noisy Mule Barn at Angola, Mr. Bone describes how he found his calling and what it means to him.

Katie Hunter-Lowrey

Since 2011, NOLA to Angola has been uniting people in a 170-mile solidarity bike ride from Municipal Court in the shadow of Orleans Parish Prison to Angola Prison, and that solidarity extends way beyond the miles trekked on the ride. The ride focuses on bringing people together, no matter what barriers separate them. NolaVie's Kelley Crawford speaks with Katie Hunter-Lowrey, one of the ride's organizers.

Visit NolaVie's website for a related article written by Kelley Crawford.