coastal land loss

Kevin Gautreaux / LPB

We hear a lot about how the Louisiana coast is disappearing. The state has lost about 2,000 square miles of coastal marsh since the 1930s. One of the biggest reasons: subsidence. What is subsidence? Why does it happen and what can we do to stop it?

Molly Keogh / Tulane University

Louisiana’s soil is sinking much faster than previously thought -- that’s the conclusion of a new report out this week from Tulane University.

This week on the Coastal News Roundup, WWNO’s Travis Lux speaks with Tulane wetlands geologist Molly Keogh, who authored the report, about what that means for sea level rise predictions in Louisiana.

CPRA

Louisiana’s Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority (CPRA) released a draft of its new annual plan at the monthly CPRA Board meeting on Wednesday, Jan.16. At the meeting, officials said they plan to seek permits for a significantly bigger Mid-Breton river diversion.

Travis Lux / WWNO

For all you Grinches out there chomping at the bit to get rid of your Christmas tree, you might want to wait until January. Several local governments will be collecting and recycling trees in the new year to help fight coastal land loss.

Tristan Baurick / Nola.com | The Times-Picayune

This week on the Coastal News Roundup: marshes are usually pretty wet, so you might not think they'd burn -- but near Avery Island, land managers are lighting them on fire. Plus, we discuss conflict of interest accusations around one of the state’s big coastal restoration projects.

WWNO’s Travis Lux talks about the week in coastal news with environment reporter Tristan Baurick from Nola.com | The Times-Picayune.

New Orleans: Ready Or Not? The Storms Will Come

Jul 12, 2018
Michael Isaac Stein / The Lens

Improvements to the federal hurricane protection system mean New Orleans is better prepared for storms than ever before. But just outside the levees, coastal land loss continues to be a threat. To address it experts say officials need to come to terms with what it means to be a coastal city.

 

Listening Coast

This week on the Coastal New Roundup: how the state of Louisiana sometimes benefits from coastal erosion. Plus, an update on the fight over sediment diversions in Plaquemines Parish.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Sinkholes. Potholes. The streets of New Orleans are full of them. No matter how you get around — by bus, car, bike — you've probably seen (and felt) your fair share of them. 

WWNO's Coastal Desk is hosting a sinkhole and pothole tour in Mid-City on May 12, in collaboration with The Lens and iSeeChange, and we'd love for you to join us. 

Anjali Fernandes

This week on the roundup: a new study out of Tulane finds the Mississippi River can’t keep up with coastal land loss, an oil spill shuts down the river, and Hurricane names are retired.

 

WWNO’s Travis Lux and Nola.com/The Times Picayune’s Sara Sneath talk about the week in coastal news.

Elizabeth Chamberlain / Vanderbilt University

According to new research, the Mississippi River delta will be much smaller in the future — even as the state plans to spend billions trying to rebuild it.

 

The researchers, led by Elizabeth Chamberlain — who is now at Vanderbilt after getting a PhD from Tulane — looked at how the Mississippi River used to build land thousands of years ago, which can illustrate how it might build land in the future. They took samples of sediment up and down Bayou Lafourche — which was the main river channel at the time.

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