Hurricane Katrina

Find stories from WWNO, NPR and our partner stations as we explore New Orleans and the Gulf South 10 years after Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath.

In Remembrance: Ronnie Virgets

May 22, 2019
Fred Kasten

Ronnie Virgets was the quintessential New Orleanian: earthy, literate, funny, thoughtful, bawdy, bit-of-a-rogue, well-mannered, generous, sly, fun-loving — and one of our most insightful commentators on the vagaries of life in the Crescent City. When he passed away on Monday, May 20, 2019 at age 77, Virgets left a rich legacy of award-winning stories he’s told on the radio, on television and in print.

BP

This week on the Coastal News Roundup, WWNO’s Travis Lux talks with Mark Schleifstein, environment reporter for Nola.com/The Times-Picayune, about a big new oil find in the Gulf of Mexico. Plus, the latest on a lawsuit related to Hurricane Katrina damages.

 

The following transcript has been lightly edited:

Illustration by Jasper Means

Kathleen Babineaux Blanco: a carpet cleaner’s daughter from New Iberia turned school teacher turned stay-at-home mom turned…Louisiana's first female governor. In 2003, her focus was on education reform, juvenile justice, and economic development. And halfway into her first and only term, it looked like she had a good chance at re-election. But that all changed, with Hurricane Katrina. 

Sticky Wicket: Louisiana Politics Versus the Press is a new mini series out of WWNO New Orleans Public Radio and WRKF Baton Rouge Public Radio that takes on four historic clashes between Louisiana politicians and the media, one at a time. These relationships have always been love/hate in the Pelican state.

Click on the player above to hear the trailer, and tune in Tuesday, November 13th at 630 p.m. to hear the first episode live on WWNO. 

Coastal News Roundup: Katrina Anniversary

Aug 31, 2018
NASA

This week marks the 13th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina. WWNO's Tegan Wendland talked with NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune environment reporter Mark Schleifstein about how that storm has affected the area's perception of risk, the levee system and the nation's hurricane forecasting.

Travis Lux / WWNO

Just ahead of the 13th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, a museum dedicated to educating people about the storm -- and the levee breaches -- has opened in Gentilly.

The Flooded House Museum is located at 4918 Warrington Dr. in Gentilly. It was severely damaged when the London Avenue Canal levee, which runs directly behind it, failed during the storm.

 

It’s been redone to look like it did the day before the levees broke and flooded the city. Visitors can peer in through the windows, like you would a dollhouse or diorama.

American Routes Shortcuts: Allen Toussaint

Dec 1, 2017
Allen Toussaint
American Routes

This week on American Routes Shortcuts, we celebrate New Orleans piano man and producer extraordinaire, Allen Toussaint, who passed away in November 2015. Back in September 2005, just weeks after Katrina, Nick Spitzer interviewed Toussaint at his New York hotel. He was dressed impeccably as ever, with suit and sandals, plus colors that matched from socks to tie to hankie. In a few days he’d headline the Big Apple for the Big Easy fundraiser at Madison Square Garden.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

A federal audit says FEMA should stop sending money to the City of New Orleans for repairing road and water-system damage sustained during hurricanes Katrina and Rita almost 12 years ago.

 

FEMA disagrees with the findings, and the city plans to press forward with repairs.

 

In order to get money from FEMA to repair its streets and sewer lines, city officials had to prove the damage was caused directly by hurricanes Katrina and Rita. After reviewing documents and consulting with engineers, FEMA agreed. It pledged to give the city $2.04 billion in December 2015.

Volunteer Lineup
Nina Feldman

Hurricane season starts today, and the city encourages all residents to have their own evacuation plan. But not everyone can get out of town on their own. That’s why New Orleans has developed a citywide assisted evacuation system. To run smoothly, a lot of agencies have to work together - and people have to know about it, too.

 

 

The U.S. Supreme Court has upheld a jury verdict finding that State Farm Fire and Casualty Co. defrauded the federal government after Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf Coast in 2005.

In the years before the hurricane, State Farm issued both federal government-backed flood insurance policies and general homeowners policies. After the hurricane, the company ordered its claims adjusters to misclassify wind damage as flood damage to shift liability to the government and spare the insurance company's coffers.

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