Music

Autumn Equinox & Remembering Aretha Franklin

Sep 17, 2019

As temperatures begin to dip and the leaves turn color, we celebrate the Autumnal Equinox with a soundtrack for the changing season.

Continuum presents dance music that may have been heard in The Garden of Mirth (a garden of love) from the 13th Century poem, The Romance of the Rose, a medieval French poem styled as an allegorical dream vision. It is a notable instance of courtly literature. The work's stated purpose is to both entertain and to teach others about the Art of Love. At various times in the poem, the "Rose" of the title is seen as the name of the lady, and as a symbol of female sexuality in general.

Wendell Brunious

Sep 12, 2019
Music Inside Out

By his count, Wendell Brunious knows more than 2,000 songs. Some are from the Great American Songbook, some are traditional, swing and bebop jazz gems and many are from the golden era of New Orleans rhythm and blues. A goodly few are homemade. Wendell’s father, John “Picket” Brunious, Sr. was a composer and arranger, as was his brother John, Jr. Wendell says he plays their music to keep them ever-present, but he has his own of stock of originals. Over a more than 50 year-career in the business, he says his number one rule remains, “Keep it simple, stupid.”

Guilty Pleasures Volume 2: Then & Now

Sep 10, 2019

For Volume 2 of our Guilty Pleasures series, we revel in the freedom to create an eclectic flow—during these days of algorithmic radio—from Lotte Lenya singing “Mack the Knife” to a Japanese take on Archie Bell and the Drells’ “Tighten Up.” We look toward summer with music from the Kinks and John Prine, and cool down with tunes by Ramsey Lewis and Oscar Brown, Jr. Plus some listener-requested guilty pleasures from Bob Marley to Bonnie Raitt. Sit back, tune in, and indulge guilt-free!

Continuum presents harpsichord music by the Baroque French composer and harpsichordist, Francois Couperin (1668-1733). His most intriguing harpsichord work without a doubt is "The Mysterious Barricades". Music historians and scholars have never been able to give a reason for the name of the composition. Perhaps Couperin had a future vision of the many streets in uptown New Orleans that were closed by barricades and repaired as a result of hurricane Katrina in 2005. New Orleans born harpsichordist Skip Sempe performs these interesting compositions.

Helen Gillet at the Sugar Maple
Art Montes

German artist David Helbich first coined the term “Belgian solutions” when he moved to Brussels in the early-2000s. It refers to the ad-lib alterations to the architecture and infrastructure of the EU capital, which Helbich has made a central theme in his photography.

We peer into the minds of musical dreamers of the past and present, exploring dreams of love, immigration, and a more perfect union. Singer songmaker Jesse Colin Young of the Youngbloods speaks of the 60’s folk revival in Greenwich Village and his dreams realized in the anthemic 1967 song “Get Together.” Then, Haitian American cellist and singer Leyla McCalla describes her journey from New York to New Orleans, connecting the cultural histories she’d long dreamed of along the way. Plus dreamscapes from Rhiannon Giddens, Los Cenzontles, Mahalia Jackson and John Prine.

One of the most famous gifted musicians in the field of early music is the Catalan viol player, Jordi Savall. He is truly a master of the instrument. On this Continuum you’ll hear his extraordinary playing of historical Celtic music. Joining him is the outstanding medieval harpist, Andrew Lawrence-King . Both the viol and harp are rarely heard together in performance. This it truly a remarkable and memorable CD. The CD used is: The Celtic Viol (Jordi Savall, Andrew Lawrence-King et al) - AliaVox AVSA 9878.

In case you’re wondering — yes, this is a Best of Music Inside Out program. But the topic is universal. The songs we hear as children — even the ones we don’t like — help shape our feelings about the music we love as adults.

Labor Day Live from New Orleans

Aug 27, 2019

This Labor Day weekend, we’re rockin’ from the French Quarter Festival: a free, homegrown, four-day annual event featuring a vast array of local music presented on stages throughout the city's oldest neighborhood. We'll hear from trumpeter Kermit Ruffins, Creole banjo man Don Vappie, zydeco accordionist Bruce “Sunpie” Barnes and the Louisiana Sunspots, the all-female Original Pinettes Brass Band, Latin rockers the Iguanas, and trombonist Corey Henry’s Tremé Funket.

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