Music

Breaking Out: British Blues to New Orleans Bounce

Jul 16, 2019
Big Freedia and John Mayall
David Gomez

From Great Britain to the Big Easy, we explore the sounds of musical and social breakouts. First, we hear how British blues pioneer John Mayall broke out of England with his band the Bluesbreakers, bringing British blues to a larger audience. We’ll hear some of Mayall’s sources and contemporaries, like Big Maceo and Eric Clapton. Then, it’s butt shakes and backbeats with Big Freedia, the Queen Diva of New Orleans Bounce, a rhythmic dance music with sources in hip hop and rap, as well as much earlier jazz and R&B.

One of the major American early music ensembles, The Baltimore Consort, was founded in 1980. On this Continuum you'll hear a wide variety of excerpts from three of their CDs, featuring the female singer, Custer LaRue, who specializes in Renaissance music and traditional Folk music. The recordings uses are: The Ladyes Delight - Dorian 90252 DOR, The Art of the Bawdy Song - Dorian DOR 90155, and The Mad Buckgoat - Dorian DOR 90279.

Scott Saltzman

The poetics of pickup trucks and cutoffs are not lost on Jim McCormick. Nor are the subtleties of Trans Ams and the beverage choices of the young and hay-baling set. And that’s how it should be for a poet-turned-Nashville songwriter.

A New Orleans native (and still occasional resident), McCormick penned two of 2012′s number one songs on the country charts. But all that success — and it is considerable — hasn’t gone to his head. He’s stayed humble. And funny. And grateful for the collaborations and to the mentors through the years.

Making New Orleans Music

Jul 9, 2019

It’s a two-hour walk through streets of the city as we dive into two great eras of New Orleans music. First, it’s the 1940s and 50s R&B hit factory with studio man Cosimo Matassa, producer, arranger, trumpet player Dave Bartholomew who passed away recently, drummer Earl Palmerand more. We also chat with The Meters—Art Neville, George Porter, Leo Nocentelli and Zigaboo Modeliste—and get to the bottom of the bottom, find out what’s in the pocket, and get a definition of funk from the four men who continue to dish it out.

A very large repertoire of Sephardic music is available on CD recordings. Continuum is pleased to present a wide selection of Songs of the Sephardim from their library performed by three recognized ensembles who play this music expertly. The recordings used are A Song of David (La Rondinella) - Dorian DIS-80130, The Sacred Bridge (The Boston Camerata) - Erato 2292-45513, and Diaspora Sefardi (Hesperion XXI) - AliaVox AV9809.

Rick Olivier

 

More than six billion people live on the planet, and yet relatively few human voices are recognizable to the naked ear.

Irma Thomas has one of those voices.

For more than 50 years, Thomas has written, recorded and lent her voice to some of the most precious songs that Louisiana has ever produced. Now music lovers all over the world know the contralto that she calls, "Irma's sound." This week, Music Inside Out with Gwen Thompkins makes way for the Queen of New Orleans Soul.

Keep it down, y'all. Miss Irma is speaking.

 

A French Quarter Fourth 2019

Jul 2, 2019

Thursday, July 4th marks America's 243rd birthday! And, to honor the Fourth of July, Classical 104.9 FM will be presenting American and patriotic favorites all day for you.

Our local host James Arey has stirring sounds by John Williams, Louis Moreau Gottschalk, Aaron Copland, Jennifer Higdon, Michael Torke, John Philip Sousa and Leonard Bernstein on "Classical New Orleans" from 9am to 1pm.

This Continuum is a program devoted to the various aspects of medieval love. The performers are three noted ensembles specializing in early music, namely our own New Orleans Musica da Camera, Sequentia and the Boston Camerata. Recordings used are Maiden, Mother, Muse (New Orleans Musica da Camera) - Centaur CRC 2434, Dante and the Troubadours (Sequentia) - Deutsche Harmonia Mundi 05472-7727-2, and Tristan et Iseult (The Boston Camerata) - Erato ECD 75528.

At first, there wasn’t a name for the kind of music that Fats Domino played.

He called it rhythm and blues. But Domino’s songs stretched beyond that category.

In the late 1940s, Domino was working at a mattress factory in New Orleans and playing piano at night. He’d just gotten married … and both his waistline and fan base were expanding. That’s when the bandleader Billy Diamond first called him “Fats” — and predicted he’d have an outsized career.

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