Poppy Tooker

Host of Louisiana Eats!

Poppy is the host and executive producer of the weekly show, Louisiana Eats! Food personality, culinary teacher and author, Poppy Tooker is passionate about food and the people who bring it to the table.

Poppy provides weekly restaurant commentary on, “Steppin’ Out” (WYES TV). Her book, The Crescent City Farmers Market Cookbook received a Tabasco cookbook award and was named “Cookbook of the Year” by New Orleans Magazine.She was recognized by the Times-Picayune as a “Hero of the Storm” for her work reviving New Orleans restaurants and food providers following Hurricane Katrina. The International Association of Cooking Professionals recognized Poppy’s rebuilding efforts at their annual conference in April 2008, with their first ever, Community Service Award.

For over 25 years, Poppy’s cooking classes have centered on history and tradition as well as the food science behind her preparation.

Ways to Connect

The Interior of Kitchen Witch Bookstore
Kitchen Witch

On this week's show, we look at cookbooks as a cultural artifact and biographical portrait. We begin at Kitchen Witch, a store in New Orleans specializing in rare and used cookbooks. With their shop scheduled to close soon, owners Debbie Lindsey and Philipe LaMancusa look back on two decades of business—and some of their biggest sellers.

Coffee Science on Broad Street in New Orleans.
Original photo by Infrogmation of New Orleans / Wikimedia Commons

Coffee, tea, kombucha? What's brewing in your neck of the woods? On this week's Louisiana Eats, we're examining the brewing process from all sides.

This week, we mark the passing of New Orleans icon, and our dear friend, Leah Chase, who died Saturday, June 1 at the age of 96. We spend the hour honoring Leah's talent and achievements and the legacy she leaves behind.

Chefs Paul Chell and Michael Gullotta with Louisiana Eats Host Poppy Tooker
Reggie Morris / Louisiana Eats

On this week’s Louisiana Eats we’re taking a vacation with some of our favorite people from the food and drinks world.

Evan Gregoire
Evan Gregoire

Louisiana Eats ventures from land to sea to learn where our food comes from and meet the people responsible for bringing the bounty to our table.

"Free Women of Color with their Children and Servants in a Landscape" by Agostino Brunias
wikipedia

The origins of food and spirits are usually not well known and can sometimes be hard to track down.  After all, how do you figure out where something that’s been around for centuries originated? On this week’s show we’ll speak with several culinary historians about the history of some fabulous foods, and some spirits too. 

Orlando Vega At Congreso Cubano booth w/ yucca fries & chimichurri.
Poppy Tooker / Louisiana Eats

2019 marks a huge milestone for the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival… 50 years! Yet, there is another benchmark being met this year. The Food Heritage Stage, which was conceived 20 years after the first Jazzfest, is turning 30. This week on Louisiana Eats, we’ll explore the Food Heritage Stage through the lens of chefs that have presented over the years, along with the people that helped pull it all together.

Karlos Knott of Bayou Teche Brewery with host Poppy Tooker
Reggie Morris / Louisiana Eats

Something’s brewing on Louisiana Eats! On this week’s show we’re taking a look at our local craft beer industry.

We begin with Bayou Teche brewery owner Karlos Knott.  Considering they are celebrating their 10th year in operation, we thought it was the perfect time to revisit with Karlos to see what’s been brewing in Arnaudville and get a glimpse of what the future holds.

Poppy Visits the Remedy Room
Joe Shriner

Spring festival season is upon us, so on this week’s Louisiana Eats we’re going to get you ready to be the host—or hostess—with the mostess!

Hans and Ragnar Karlsson, former and current owner of the Trolley Stop Cafe  in New Orleans. The family restaurant was featured in the season premiere of "Gordon Ramsay's 24 Hours to Hell and Back."
Photo courtesy of Ragnar Karlsson

Reality food TV may be a boon for networks, but what happens to local chefs and restaurants after the cameras stop rolling? On this week's Louisiana Eats, we talk to people who have participated in food TV in its various forms, with varying results.

Pages