gun violence

New Orleans police chief Shaun Ferguson told reporters investigators believe the shooting of ten on Canal Street stemmed from a personal feud.
Jess Clark / WWNO - New Orleans Public Radio

New Orleans police still haven't made an arrest in the shooting of ten people on Canal Street in the French Quarter early Sunday morning. Previous reports put the number of victims at 11, but police lowered the number Monday to ten.

George Washington Carver High School students Kennis Fairley (left), Marneisha Gilmore and Jacorey Warner.
Cheryl Gerber / WWNO - New Orleans Public Radio

Over the last four weeks, WWNO has brought listeners our series "This Is Why It Matters" - stories about people our community has lost to gun violence.

Jacorey Warner [left] is interviewed by his friend and classmate Marneisha Gilmore about his friend Deshaun Singleton.
Cheryl Gerber / WWNO - New Orleans Public Radio

Our student-produced series “This Is Why It Matters” is about the people our community has lost to gun violence.

Carver junior Kennis Fairley and drama teacher Ateja Lewis.
Cheryl Gerber / WWNO - New Orleans Public Radio

Our student-produced series “This Is Why It Matters” is about the lives of people our community has lost to gun violence. One thing students at George Washington Carver High School discovered in their reporting is that students aren’t the only people at school struggling with grief - many Carver teachers are grappling with the emotional toll of having lost students to homicide. Some teachers are also survivors of their own trauma.

Carver junior Marneisha Gilmore with the cut-out of her sister Markeisha Gilmore.
Cheryl Gerber / WWNO - New Orleans Public Radio

Our student-produced series "This Is Why It Matters" is mostly about the people our community has lost to gun violence. But one of our student producers, George Washington Carver High School junior Marneisha Gilmore, has a story that's a little different.

Marneisha's older sister, Markeisha Gilmore, was 18 years old when she died in an accident in January 2019. Markeisha loved to dance and listen to music. She had graduated from McDonogh 35 Senior High School, and was studying nursing at Louisiana State University.

Shawanda Warren, Natasha Warren, Loghan Greenwood, Tammy Bradley and Kawanda Warren pose with photos of Bug at their home in New Orleans.
Cheryl Gerber / WWNO - New Orleans Public Radio

New Orleans has one of the highest murder rates in the country, and research shows more than half of the young people in this city have lost someone to homicide - most often to gun violence. Students at George Washington Carver High School are no exception, and they have stories to tell - not just about the trauma of losing someone - but about the lives of the people they've lost. Together with WWNO education reporter Jess Clark and radio producer Eve Abrams, a group of Carver students produced the series '"This Is Why It Matters" for WWNO.

City of New Orleans

New Orleans’ homicide rate has fallen in recent decades, but the city still has one of the highest murder rates in the country. Each year since 1972, at least 145 people have been murdered in New Orleans. And nearly all of the victims were killed by firearms. Mayor LaToya Cantrell has just announced a new plan to tackle gun violence. WWNO’s Karl Lengel spoke with Joshua Cox, the Mayor's Director of Strategic Initiatives, about the new Gun Violence Reduction Plan.

At a vigil, students lay flowers on the ground near where educator Reginald Field was gunned down.
Jess Clark / WWNO - New Orleans Public Radio

Students, colleagues, friends and family gathered Wednesday afternoon to remember New Orleans educator Reginald Field. Field was 50 years old when he was shot and killed on Saturday, May 25 - one of 17 people police say were shot over a violent Memorial Day weekend. Students remember Field as being strict, but caring.

WWNO's newsroom has been recognized with four 2019 Regional Edward R. Murrow Awards.

The Murrow Awards are the embodiment of the values and principles set forth by Edward R. Murrow, a journalism pioneer who set the standards for the highest quality of broadcast journalism.

Fifteen-year-old Zianca Bailey wants to change gun laws to reduce gun deaths. She helped organize the March for Our Lives to end gun violence.
Jess Clark / WWNO - New Orleans Public Radio

Pastor Lisa Fitzpatrick spends every weeknight at an old Catholic school building in Central City. Tonight she’s sliding slices of pizza onto paper plates for about a dozen hungry teenagers.

Pages